Graffiti Artistry in Da House

Spray paint on the walls and breakdancers in the house…it’s the 80s all over again here at the City Museum! Join the b-boys and b-girls of Hush Tours in our rotunda for breakdancing & hip hop every Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday at 11:30 a.m.

Come step your print on the museum; how often will you get to break it down on the marble floors of Fifth Ave.? It’s all part of our City as Canvas summer, bringing the graffiti art of Keith Haring, Lee Quiñones, LADY PINK, and FUTURA 2000 to life! 

Check out these steps from our debut demo this morning.

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The Rotunda: Where we break it down!

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#CityasCanvas

http://thehushreview.com/

The winds were the strongest I have ever experienced

"Leading up to the storm, we were told to evacuate City Island. The police literally went door to door. Many of our neighbors did leave. In over 100 years, no storm has ever come close to flooding our home, we are on high ground, so we stayed. As a volunteer for our local paper, The Island Current, I also knew I wanted to photograph this storm. At the time I took the photograph of the waves crashing into the Kayak Club, the winds were the strongest I have ever experienced. But I was sheltered by waterfront condos behind me and to my left."
-Rick DeWitt

Rising Waters, Photographs of Hurricane Sandy runs through Sunday, April 20 at the Museum of the City of New York.

The winds were the strongest I have ever experienced

"Leading up to the storm, we were told to evacuate City Island. The police literally went door to door. Many of our neighbors did leave. In over 100 years, no storm has ever come close to flooding our home, we are on high ground, so we stayed. As a volunteer for our local paper, The Island Current, I also knew I wanted to photograph this storm. At the time I took the photograph of the waves crashing into the Kayak Club, the winds were the strongest I have ever experienced. But I was sheltered by waterfront condos behind me and to my left."

-Rick DeWitt

Rising Waters, Photographs of Hurricane Sandy runs through Sunday, April 20 at the Museum of the City of New York.

Sandy’s Impacts: Life as they knew it was completely ripped out and interrupted
"When I made the Rising Waters photo I was hired by Gary Segal, President of Five Star Electric. They were hired by the City to rewire homes on the Rockaway peninsula devastated by hurricane Sandy for Rapid Repairs. I was photographing the men, lots of basements and boilers… As I was walking through the kitchen of this home - the scene you see stopped me in my tracks- it was a definitive moment, a decisive moment - it was the human story, not the rapid repairs story. I made that pic for me not for Five Star. It couldn’t be ignored. Still tacked to the wall were emergency phone numbers. Life as they knew it was completely ripped out and interrupted.”
— Ellen Wolff
Rising Waters, Photographs of Hurricane Sandy runs through Sunday, April 20 at the Museum of the City of New York.

Sandy’s Impacts: Life as they knew it was completely ripped out and interrupted

"When I made the Rising Waters photo I was hired by Gary Segal, President of Five Star Electric. They were hired by the City to rewire homes on the Rockaway peninsula devastated by hurricane Sandy for Rapid Repairs. I was photographing the men, lots of basements and boilers…

As I was walking through the kitchen of this home - the scene you see stopped me in my tracks- it was a definitive moment, a decisive moment - it was the human story, not the rapid repairs story. I made that pic for me not for Five Star. It couldn’t be ignored. Still tacked to the wall were emergency phone numbers. Life as they knew it was completely ripped out and interrupted.”

Ellen Wolff


Rising Waters, Photographs of Hurricane Sandy runs through Sunday, April 20 at the Museum of the City of New York.

Sandy’s Impacts: We may lose our material wealth but we can never lose our memories
"This particular picture was taken in New Dorp, Staten Island.  The girl’s name on the picture is Ashley and she had just found her mother’s wedding dress in the debris of their home in New Dorp.  She was trying it on as I was walking past, I spoke to her and her family and they allowed me to photograph her.  This picture for me stands out because it reminds us that we may lose our material wealth but we can never lose our memories.  Further more, the contrast between the destruction and the white wedding dress is striking and shocking but leaves somehow a positive note."
— Margarita Mavromichalis
Rising Waters, Photographs of Hurricane Sandy runs through Sunday, April 20 at the Museum of the City of New York.

Sandy’s Impacts: We may lose our material wealth but we can never lose our memories

"This particular picture was taken in New Dorp, Staten Island.  The girl’s name on the picture is Ashley and she had just found her mother’s wedding dress in the debris of their home in New Dorp.  She was trying it on as I was walking past, I spoke to her and her family and they allowed me to photograph her.  This picture for me stands out because it reminds us that we may lose our material wealth but we can never lose our memories.  Further more, the contrast between the destruction and the white wedding dress is striking and shocking but leaves somehow a positive note."

— Margarita Mavromichalis

Rising Waters, Photographs of Hurricane Sandy runs through Sunday, April 20 at the Museum of the City of New York.

It was the world’s first hip-hop motion picture. Tickets are now on sale for the March 20 screening of Charlie Ahearn’s film “Wild Style” depicting breakdancing, freestyle MCing, and graffiti writing on the streets and subways of New York in 1980s. A Q&A with the director and artists SHARP and ZEPHYR will follow the screening: http://bit.ly/1h4ZWpc #CityAsCanvas

It was the world’s first hip-hop motion picture. Tickets are now on sale for the March 20 screening of Charlie Ahearn’s film “Wild Style” depicting breakdancing, freestyle MCing, and graffiti writing on the streets and subways of New York in 1980s. A Q&A with the director and artists SHARP and ZEPHYR will follow the screening: http://bit.ly/1h4ZWpc #CityAsCanvas

"This fascinating show and its indispensable catalog chronicle the rise and fall of the calligraphic, illegal art form known as “wild style” graffiti in New York in the 1970s and ’80s."

— The New York Times http://nyti.ms/1kGkPwB

“A Guastavino State of Mind.” @eoculus previews Palaces for the People, opening 3/26 at the @museumofcityny

Guastavino in the press

“As New York is hard-edged and mechanistic, the ceilings are sensuously organic; as it is tightly vertical, they are broadly expansive; as it is brooding, they are joyous. And what is astonishing about these great curving forms… is that they are made up of relentlessly orthogonal building blocks: flat clay tiles, typically 6 inches by 12 inches.”

—The New York Times http://nyti.ms/1fP3VKd

 

Do you recognize this man? Some say he saved New York’s Irish. Learn more about “Dagger John” Hughes: http://bit.ly/1fXPOMD

Do you recognize this man? Some say he saved New York’s Irish. Learn more about “Dagger John” Hughes: http://bit.ly/1fXPOMD

#regram from @klein23: Noa and #Dondi hanging out in #CityAsCanvas. Visit the @museumofcityny to see @marthacoopergram’s photograph plus nearly 150 works of New York graffiti art from the #MartinWong Collection. 

#regram from @klein23: Noa and #Dondi hanging out in #CityAsCanvas. Visit the @museumofcityny to see @marthacoopergram’s photograph plus nearly 150 works of New York graffiti art from the #MartinWong Collection.